Tag Archives: partial remission

A CT for Christmas

CT-machine

It’s now been almost four full 28 day treatment cycles with investigational PI3K inhibitor IPI-145 and it’s time for another CT scan (#4) tomorrow. This will be my third since August and they’ll be measuring my spleen, liver and many lymph nodes for shrinkage or reduction in lymphadenopathy as a result of the therapy. The key words I’ll be listening for from Dr Flinn afterwards will be Partial Remission or simply PR. 50% reduction across the board should be attainable from the numbers I’ve been watching and it would be an awesome Christmas gift!

Screenshot from 2013-11-20 14:18:59

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Partial Remission?

Screenshot from 2013-11-20 14:18:59

From what I’ve read, this seems to be the minimum goal for success in treatment of this CLL but a definition has eluded me until now. According to the journal “blood” 2008 111: 5446-5456 Prepublished online January 23, 2008;doi:10.1182/blood-2007-06-093906 it is:

5.2. Partial remission (PR)
PR is defined by the criteria described in sections 5.2.1, 5.2.2, or
5.2.3 (if abnormal before therapy), as well as one or more of the
features listed in section 5.2.4. To define a PR, these parameters need to be documented for a minimal duration of 2 months (Table
4). Constitutional symptoms persisting for more than 1 month
should be recorded.
5.2.1. A decrease in the number of blood lymphocytes by 50%
or more from the value before therapy.
5.2.2. Reduction in lymphadenopathy (by CT scans in clinical
trials 57 or by palpation in general practice) as defined by the
following:
5.2.2.1. A decrease in lymph node size by 50% or more either in
the sum products of up to 6 lymph nodes, or in the largest diameter
of the enlarged lymph node(s) detected prior to therapy.
5.2.2.2. No increase in any lymph node, and no new enlarged
lymph node. In small lymph nodes (< 2 cm), an increase of less
than 25% is not considered to be significant.
5.2.3. A reduction in the noted pretreatment enlargement of
the spleen or liver by 50% or more, as detected by CT scan (in
clinical trials) or palpation (in general practice).
5.2.4. The blood count should show one of the following
results:
5.2.4.1. Neutrophils more than 1.5 ϫ 109/L (1500/uL) without need for exogenous growth factors.
5.2.4.2. Platelet counts greater than 100 ϫ 109/L (100,000/uL) or 50% improvement over baseline without need for exogenous growth factors.
5.2.4.3. Hemoglobin greater than 110 g/L (11.0 g/dL) or 50%
improvement over baseline without requiring red blood cell
transfusions or exogenous erythropoietin.

Failure is not an option! We are going to get there and hope and pray for eventual full remission.