Tag Archives: Dr Flinn

ASH 2013

ash2013

The ASH 2013 (American Society of Hematology) annual meeting kicks off in New Orleans today. There will be many presentations; this one I am most eagerly awaiting. It presents current data on the Infinity Pharmaceuticals ipi-145 clinical trial I am enrolled in. The presenter, Dr Ian Flinn is my Hematologist/Oncologist. You can read the full abstract here. Here’s a tidbit.

#677 Preliminary Safety and Efficacy Of IPI-145, a Potent Inhibitor Of Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase-δ,γ, In Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Program: Oral and Poster Abstracts
Type: Oral
Session: 642. CLL: Therapy, excluding Transplantation: Clinical Trials of B Cell Receptor Signaling Inhibitors
Monday, December 9, 2013: 5:30 PM
295-296 (Ernest N. Morial Convention Center)

Ian Flinn, MD, PhD1, Manish Patel, MD1,2*, Brad S. Kahl, MD3, Steven M. Horwitz, MD4, Francine M. Foss, MD5, Yasuhiro Oki, MD6, Pierluigi Porcu, MD7, Jennifer Sweeney, BS8*, Kerstin Allen, MA8*, Kerrie Faia, MS8*, Patricia Harris, MPH8*, Joi Dunbar, PharmD8*, Howard M. Stern, M.D., Ph.D.8*, Patrick Kelly, MD8 and Susan O’Brien, MD6

Clinical activity has been observed in R/R CLL pts at all doses of IPI-145 studied from 8 mg to 75 mg BID and in pts with R/R high-risk disease (TP53 mut/17pdel).  Treatment-related lymphocytosis is rapid, with the median ALC return to baseline within 6 cycles of treatment.  Reduction in adenopathy occurs early with no apparent dose-dependence.  Nodal responses (>50% reduction in adenopathy by CT assessment) occurred in 79% of pts after 2 treatment cycles.  Best overall response (based on investigator assessment per IWCLL) in evaluable pts to date (median [range] number of cycles 5.1 [1-21.1]) is 52%, with 1 CR, 15 PR, 14 SD and 1 PD. The ORR for the 19 evaluable pts treated at ≤25 mg BID is 53% (10/19; including 1 CR) and 7 of the 8 SD pts achieving nodal response.  Resolution of lymphocytosis may lead to an increase in best ORR for SD pts who remain on study.  R/R pts with high-risk disease (TP53 mut/17pdel) had similar ORR.
Conclusions:  IPI-145, an oral, potent PI3K-δ,γ inhibitor, appears well tolerated and has shown promising clinical activity in pts with R/R CLL across the range of doses examined.  The PK/PD and clinical activity suggest that 25 mg BID is a biologically active dose in R/R CLL, and this dose has been selected for an upcoming randomized Phase 3 trial in R/R CLL. Updated data from treatment-naïve CLL pts who received IPI-145 at 25 mg BID and R/R CLL pts who received IPI-145 at 25 mg and 75 mg BID will be presented.

Hopeful CLL commentary from Dr Bruce Cheson

Here’s a snippet from his post about the upcoming ASH (American Society of Hematology) conference in New Orleans, LA in December. My own doc, Dr Ian Flinn will be presenting on trial data with ipi-145. I can’t wait. There is a video on page one but the audio did not play well for me. Here’s page three from the article

Bumper Crop of New Agents

The rest of the studies focus on the new agents. We have several ibrutinib trials, including a single-agent study in patients with or without 17p deletion. There will be the final analysis of bendamustine and rituximab plus ibrutinib.[13] Do you need the chemotherapy? Do you need the bendamustine? There will be another abstract[14] with rituximab and ibrutinib alone.

This isn’t the only exciting drug. There are phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase inhibitors, which appear to be very good and are very impressive, perhaps as good as ibrutinib when you combine them with a drug like rituximab. In fact, a recent study of rituximab-idelalisib vs rituximab-placebo was closed early because of a survival advantage.

We are also going to be seeing a list of new PI 3-kinase inhibitors for the treatment of CLL: a new delta inhibitor, a new gamma inhibitor, and others. We’ll have to see which of these provides an advantage over the others, if at all. But in any event, we have great new drugs that will be changing the landscape of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

This is Bruce Cheson, signing off for Medscape Hematology. I will be back with you after the ASH meeting in New Orleans. See you there. Goodbye.

Hold that thought…

WaitingForDoctorI saw my hematologist/oncologist Dr Flinn today and he is encouraged with the results we are seeing so far on the ipi-145 investigational drug (Me too but it’s still early in the game). My blood counts are seemingly on their way back. We discussed my recent ER visit and gall bladder issues and for reasons I don’t yet understand, he said he would probably want me to wait a while on the surgery. I know my risk for opportunistic infections is pretty high still. I am still meeting with the surgeon later this week and after that will have another talk with Dr Flinn about where we go from here.

Chapter One

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Hi! I’m Don. I was diagnosed with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (aka CLL) in September of 2011. Since then, we’ve done lots of bloodwork and a bone marrow biopsy in something known in clinical circles as “watch and worry”. We’ve steadily and patiently watched my white blood cell counts rise and my red blood cell & platelet counts fall.My lymph nodes have gotten pretty big and in general, I am fatigued and don’t feel really good most days.

Fast forward to August, 2013.

This week, my platelet count had fallen to 74000 so my oncologist Dr Flinn and I both agreed that it was time to begin treatment. I have a genetic mutation called short arm chromosone 17p deletion. FCR (Fludarabine + Cyclophosphamide + Rituxan) is the standard chemotherapy regimen for CLL these days but it’s not known to be all that effective in terms of achieving durable remissions for those of us in the 17p club. Without a bone marrow/stem cell transplant, this is not generally considered a curable cancer and managing it over the long term is what we’ll have to do. We looked at some new therapy options and I believe we found a good fit. It’s all unfolding really fast and in the last few days, I’ve enrolled in a clinical trial for a new B cell receptor pathway signalling inhibitor currently called ipi-145. I will begin treatment next week. We’re gonna drop-kick this cancer with zero mercy! This is where the story begins.

drop-kick